The Journal Register (Medina, NY)

April 15, 2013

Sandstone Society to create Hall of Fame

By HOWARD BALABAN
Medina Journal-Register

Medina Journal-Register — Since its inception in 2004, the Medina Sandstone Society has sought to ensure the preservation of the durable, local rock.

By the end of the year, structures found locally and around the world featuring fantastic examples of Medina Sandstone could headline the first-ever class inducted into the Medina Sandstone Society Hall of Fame.

Society member Jim Hancock said he and fellow members David Miller and John Slack are the founding members of selection committee. They will be responsible for researching Hall of Fame candidates and identifying “truly outstanding structures made of sandstone.”

Hancock said the recommendations of the committee would go before the society’s board for approval before any building earns the right to be inducted.

“We would also invite any input from our Stone Cutters,” Hancock said of the roughly 150 society supporters. “We want to know what they suggest.”

Hancock said Medina Sandstone is “such a beautiful rock” found in a variety of homes and churches both locally and abroad. He said the stone is durable and useful and comes in a number of colors, some of which are found in impressive local buildings like St. Mary’s Church.

Citing the church as an example, Hancock said the idea for a Hall of Fame formed because society members felt the need to “publicly recognize outstanding examples of Medina Sandstone.”

Hancock said there is hope among the members to induct the inaugural class of the Medina Sandstone Society Hall of Fame in 2013. A plaque will be made for each honoree to hang within its walls, Hancock said. 

As for those who might wish to visit the Hall of Fame, Hancock said the location for the place has not yet been chosen.

“We’ll look for a location here (in Medina), and right now that could be anywhere,” Hancock explained. He said the Hall of Fame might wind up becoming part of an already-existing building or business.

When asked, he agreed the best location would be made of sandstone.

“That would be ideal,” he grinned.