The Journal Register (Medina, NY)

October 11, 2012

Albion changes parking code

By Jim Krencik
Medina Journal-Register

Medina Journal-Register — ALBION — The Albion Village Board approved a code change Wednesday that alters limits on where large vehicles can be parked overnight after ensuring that the change would not adversely effect other businesses.

The board also took the first step needed for any potential development of a village-owned Main Street lot — be it the extension of parking spaces or the proposed Orleans County Quarrymens Memorial Park.

After holding a public hearing, the village board amended a section of code that had prevented overnight parking in the village of vehicles weighing more than 6,000 lbs. aside from in specific areas.

The code had set aside the lot south of the railroad on Platt Street as an area where such vehicles could park overnight, but the growth of businesses like Claims Recovery Financial Services and Chase Bank means more employees need more parking spaces.

“Semis were taking up too much space,” Mayor Dean Theodorakos explained.

Before the village acted, they had to first make sure the proposed change did not prevent Helena Chemical from parking trucks at a loading dock bordering the parking lot.

“We don’t intend to effect their parking at the loading docks,” Codes Enforcement Officer Ron Vendetti said.

Helena’s John Ivison and Lucas Silversmith spoke with boardmembers, who added a clause to the amendment that allows trucks to continue to park at their building.

“We don’t park trucks except at the loading dock,” Ivison said.

Trustee Fred Miller added that the trucks parking their had to belong to the building’s tenant.

“You don’t want it so a semi could pull up and park there,” Miller said.

“That would be a problem,” Ivison responded.”

The village approved paying Chatfield Engineers $1,300 to conduct a survey and topography study of 19 N. Main St., where a village-owned building was removed last year. The site is under consideration for both added parking and a memorial to the immigrants who worked in the sandstone industry.

Boardmembers did not speak to either preference for the property, but cited the need for a survey for either outcome.

“Whatever we’re going to do, we need to do a survey,” Theodorakos said. “I can’t see us putting a parking lot in there without knowing the boundaries.”

Vendetti said the topography study would be needed for the Downtown Albion Neighborhood Advisory Committee to “logically design” their proposed project, which would be funded using grant funds and private donations.

The funding for the surveys is coming from the fund to tear down the building on the site.